Testimonials

The workshops have altered the way I approach language and opened new perspectives. I now approach translation as not only language but also as a story / message.
— Student, UCS
Sophie was really interesting and showed us various dimension of the translation skills we need to deal with an “old” text or a poem. It was a real pleasure to have her in our school.
— Teacher, Lycée International
The workshops sounded exciting and inspirational and turned out to be just that!
— Teacher, Headington School
I was inspired to look more at, and try and interpret texts in languages I do not speak. It is interesting how much of a language you can understand without ever having learnt it.
— Student, Headington School
I learnt things about language and translation that I wouldn’t have learnt in my French class.
— Student, City Academy, Hackney
I loved the workshops where we worked with idioms. It was really interesting to see how you can understand culture through certain sayings. It was cool to see how the Latin idiom had been updated and adapted into our language thousands of years later.
— Student, UCS
I really enjoyed the workshop It’s all Portuguese to us!, as I could make logical connections through my knowledge of Spanish and Latin and be able to translate some text written in a language I had never looked at before.
— Student, CLSG
My favourite part of the workshop was listening to the UN worker translate and listen simultaneously.
— Student, CLSG
It showed me my love of languages could be turned into a real job and is in fact very useful.
— Student, Headington School
Despite no one speaking Portuguese we all managed to translate the piece. That was really empowering.
— Student, Headington School
It broadened my horizons and made me want to take up more languages.
— Student, UCS
It made me feel motivated to do more translations!
— Student, Headington School
 
I am now familiar with the idea that translation isn’t necessarily just translating from one language to another. It can be interpreting actions, movements facial expressions, tone of voice and register.
— Student, UCS